Punakaiki Fund Update: new investment, extended offer

Solid progress continues
We have now received over $1 million in applications for the the December 2015 Offer, with over $800,000 received directly and $231,000 via the Snowball Effect Wholesale Platform.

Offer Extended until 31 January
We had a good number of investors and financial advisors, along with Snowball Effect, ask us for more time. Some investors want to read the material over the break, others have found that their advisors have taken the normal extended kiwi summer break until late January and others need to move funds which are tied up elsewhere. Given the length of the summer break the directors of Punakaiki Fund agreed to extend the offer until 5pm on 31st of January.

The extension is, however, subject to no material change in the portfolio. If, for example, one of the companies we invest in has a large event (like a investment transaction or major customer deal) that changes the value of the portfolio, then the directors reserve the right to close the offer at that point. So do get your applications in early.

Second New Investment
We can now announce our first follow-on investment with Raygun, who supply a SaaS product that tracks software errors and user progress in real time. Raygun was one of our initial four investments, and their progress has been very strong since that investment. Punakaiki Fund is contributing around 20% of this round, and the funds will be used to fuel Raygun’s expansion into the US market. Founder John-Daniel Trask will be moving to the US in the first quarter of 2016.

The new valuation for Raygun is already factored into the share price for this offer.

Third new investment
We are very close to contract signing but still not quite done on our third new investment.

Mobi2Go second tranche investment

We have also surpassed the capital raising threshold required to trigger the second tranche of Punakaiki Fund’s investment in Mobi2Go. The second tranche investment with double our investment in Mobi2Go and will be made in the early New Year. We are very encouraged by Mobi2Go’s progress since our investment, and they have a very strong pipeline of customers to continue their growth with next year.

The Offer

The details of the Offer are in the latest Punakaiki Fund Information Memorandum, and Exempt Investors (details of what that means are on the form) can apply using the Application Form.

Our thanks to everyone who has supported us in 2015 – we wish you all the best for the Christmas and New Year break and look forward to a prosperous 2016.

Here’s a bit of cheer from RedSeed – along with some nice statistics.

Posted in NZ Business

Punakaiki Fund – new offer for exempt investors

We’ve just launched a new wholesale offer to investors for Punakaiki Fund. It’s available only to Exempt investors, as we hit the legal limit of $2 million for crowd-funding investors back in June.

There are two ways to invest. The easiest for new investors is through Snowball Effect’s wholesale platform, or you can download the Information Memorandum and the Application Form and apply directly.

Progress

After the June crowd-funding and private offers we made eight new investments, placing five as follow-on investments with existing Punakaiki Fund companies and the other three with Vend, EverEdgeIP and Mobi2Go. We still have a couple more to announce.

We’ve also welcomed a big step up in governance, with the shareholders appointing Mike Bennetts (CEO Z Energy), Bryan Hutchins (Real Journeys) and John Berry (Pathfinder Asset Management) as directors. All are shareholders themselves. The directors (including myself) later appointed Mike Bennetts as Chair of Punakaiki Fund.

We are delighted with the progress that the companies we have invested into are making. The thirteen companies we have invested into  collectively had over $40 million in annualised revenue in September 2015, growing in aggregate by over 94% from September 2014.  Ten of those companies have over $500,000 in annualised revenue, with seven over $1 million and three over $6 million. All but one employ more than five people.

Our shareholders are seeing the benefit of that underlying revenue growth with their unrealised returns. Based on the share price in this December 2015 Offer the original investors from April 2014 who exercised their options are seeing a 49.5% annualised return (IRR), while our December 2014 investors who exercised their option are seeing a 43% return. Like that offer in 2014 this Offer is for a Share + Option, priced at $16.50. We’ve used the share component of that, or $16.17, to calculate these returns. That $16.17 is well up on the $14.50 per share price we saw at the June Snowball Effect Offer.

Read the documents

This is an investment to Exempt Investors, who will be well used to the advice to read the documents and see advice. Here again is the Offer on Snowball Effect’s wholesale platform (much easier), or download the Information Memorandum and the Application Form from us.

 

Posted in NZ Business

Pictures of Christchurch December 2015

Christchurch is a hive of activity at the moment, a combination of the old, the destroyed, the temporary and the new. It’s a place that will energise photographers – so much is going on that it is hard to know where to look.

Definitely worth a visit, and the accommodation shortage issues seem to be sorted now.

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Posted in NZ Business | 2 Comments

The future of food exports from NZ

In the last 50 years New Zealand has done a wonderful job of diversifying our export markets for food and beverages, a process somewhat forced by the UK joining the EU in 1973. We are in a strong position.

China is the biggest growth market for us – in both dollar and in percentage terms. That’s been a wonderful story of the benefits of our very early free trade agreement with China.

We are not the only food producer of course, and the giant exporter to worry about is the USA. Their absolute and percentage growth rate of exports is vast, and with TPPA they now have the ability to break open markets. In dollar terms the TPPA, which does not deal with their massive trade-supporting farm subsidies, will mainly be for the benefit of them.

The USA’s food system is largely one of production prioritised over quality, with hormones and antibiotics added to animals producing meat and milk, subsidised corn and sugar quotas leading the prevalence of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and outcomes of obesity, poor health and antibiotic resistant bugs.

New Zealand can’t hope to compete on quantity with the USA, and while our food quality here is still pretty good, one downside of these trade agreements is that people in NZ will increasingly be offered cheaper poorer quality food sourced from offshore, and that will lead to worse health outcomes for NZ (which in turn will drive worse economic outcomes).

We can and should maintain and even lift our food quality standards – but can we do so under our free trade agreements? An infamous example is Mexico being forced to open their soda market to the subsidised and cheaper HFCS sweetener. Meanwhile the US fiercely protect their own sugar producers, largely because of expat Cuban sugar growers in Florida – who wield great political power. This is at great expense to their people – with prices of refined sugar are 95% higher than global prices, and along with the subsidised HFCS that means  HFCS has a large market share as sweetener in US processed foods.

The eventual result between Mexico and the USA was a negotiated settlement whereby the US largely maintains their highly protected sugar industry and Mexico still copes with HFCS imports and substitution of sugar for HFCS. A close read of the article on the settlement makes is somewhat disturbing as we consider the impacts of TPPA.

All these fascinating charts come from the MBIE funded Coriolis Investors Guide to the Food and Beverage Industry, a worthwhile effort.

However i is a little misleading when assessing NZ’s potential to grow food production. For example, the chart below compares food production per square km between countries with varying demographics, geography and protected lands. (Other charts show production per population – again not a useful metric)

The key differences between the Netherlands and NZ go beyond our rugged terrain and highest point of 3,726 meters versus the famously flat Netherlands and a highest point of 894 meters.

The Netherlands, data from the World Bank shows, has just 11.1% of land covered by forest, but NZ has 38.6%. Meanwhile 38.6% of land in the Netherlands is arable, while NZ has just 2.1%. Are we to chop down forests?

I do not doubt that we can get more production out of NZ, even if we don’t touch the forests. But that will need to be balanced with efforts to increase positive  environmental outcomes and margins, and our resources are not as limitless as the chart above implies.

Out food is seen as cheap and safe by markets.

This is a problem  but a good one. It shows the opportunity to receive considerable margin by moving to the prestige position.

How do we do this? The answer starts at the farm. My favourite case study recently is Lewis Road Dairy – who charge outrageous amounts for their milk products sourced from an organic farmer. Their products are often sold out, and Fonterra eventually responded <correction – it was Goodman Fielder. So Fonterra is still left well behind> to Lewis Road by providing their own Puhoi branded organic milk. That’s good news for everyone, and now the real switch needs to happen at the farm level – with higher prices for organic milk (or milk/meat without palm kernels feed) driving farmers to switch their behaviour. These higher quality products sell locally and globally at super-premium prices, and there is considerable potential for New Zealand to capture and own the space globally.

What can we do as consumers?

As consumers we should demand quality foods, and we should be asking or insisting that our food quality standards remain high. Lets not allow hormone-filled meat into NZ, or dairy products produced by cows stuffed with antibiotics. Let’s reward good behaviour – e.g. by supporting McDonalds’ efforts to increase their food quality, by paying more for organic (and much tastier) food, and even switching supermarkets, as we did from the sadly declining Victoria Park New World, when high quality food disappears from shelves.

What can we do as investors?

This is something that entrepreneurs and investors can get involved with, as Lewis Road (and Firstlight Foods and others) have demonstrated that the incumbents, who are focussed on volume, can be disrupted by smaller producers and marketers. Eventually the bigger producers will lose their suppliers, or they will have to switch to higher quality inputs. We all know that a fancy packet, Silver Ferm Farms, does not change the quality of the contents.

At the back of the report is a hit-list of 200 companies. Private equity and other offshore money has made a few plays, but there are a substantial number of very high quality companies that are tightly held. Some of my favourites, such as Balle Brothers, and Dairy Goat Farm, will never sell, but there are plenty of opportunities for those with very large check books. Sadly those investors are mainly from offshore, and NZ has very little capital at work to support high growth businesses of any type. But that’s another issue.

Yes we can

It might take time, but the report does show that the farmers and growers will respond to market demand. The challenge is whether we can, as a society, help our food business ecosystem accelerate the change to owning the global high margin premium food position.

 

Posted in NZ Business | 5 Comments

Punakaiki Fund Update – Mike Bennetts is Chair

An update from Punakaiki Fund. At our September 30th AGM we elected three new directors – Mike Bennetts, Bryan Hutchins and John Berry. We held our first board meeting earlier this month. It’s a great board, and we continue to be also inspired by the founders and staff from the companies we have invested into. Chris and I have also moved into an office in downtown Auckland – a significant step after working from home for three years.

Update:

The directors elected Mike Bennetts as Chair of Punakaiki Fund. Mike brings considerable governance and executive expertise to the boardroom, and, along with the other directors, is an investor in the fund.

The board also determined that the Net Asset Value of the fund at the end of September was $12.3 million, or $14.60 per share, up from $14.14 at the June fundraising.

The Net Asset Value generally changes only when there are investor transactions within portfolio companies, and with some of our larger investments it has been a while between funding events, so Chris and I see considerable value beyond this.

The board has provisionally approved that LWCM make an offer to qualified investors before the end of 2015, most likely at a price of $16.50 per share.

Posted in NZ Business

Flounders Meetings – for founders only

Flounders Club is a periodic gathering of Auckland-based founders of companies, generally very high growth and relatively early stage.

It’s not actually a club – but simply an event focused on learning from other founders (rather than advisors or other boring speakers), and on meeting other people like yourself who are going through the start-up journey.

There are also two smaller Flounders dinner groups that meet about every month, and the ambition is that more of these will be created as well.

The event is by founders and for founders, and while food and some beverages are served the main value is that everyone in the ecosystem is getting better.

The Next Event

The next event is on Tuesday 10th at 6pm. There will be 3 guests up front as normal – this time they are Lance Hodges – ex VP of Product at Vend and co-founder of HopVentures, Josh Robb, who is VP of Engineering at publicly listed PushPay and coping with outrageous US growth and Belinda Tuki, a 2nd time founder who is rapidly growing The Honest Food company.

The speakers are more there to provoke conversation – we learn from them, but also from the interaction with the audience during and after their talk.

Get in quick

The next event is at GridAKL on Tuesday 10th at 6pm. Sign up now.

Posted in NZ Business

Punakaiki Fund adds three new directors

Punakaiki Fund press release today, marking the beginning of a new era for the fund. Chris Humphreys and I are very happy to be able to welcome such an excellent set of directors.  

Three new directors bring wealth of experience 

Auckland, 13 October 2015– Punakaiki Fund Limited, an investor in growth stage technology and software companies, has appointed three new directors at its recent AGM.  As it gears up for growth, its 475 shareholders have appointed Mike Bennetts (CEO of Z Energy), John Berry (co-founder of Pathfinder Asset Management) and Bryan Hutchins (director of Real Journeys).  All three are shareholders in Punakaiki Fund.
 
According to founder Lance Wiggs, the expanded board brings exceptional governance, commercial and capital raising experience, as Punakaiki Fund continues to raise capital and invest in more NZ high-growth technology companies.  With its last latest option round projected to raise over $1 million, the fund has successfully raised over $9 million from wholesale investors and through crowdfunding platform Snowball Effect. The fund’s assets are invested across 12 exceptional high growth companies, with two more investments pending, so Punakaiki Fund investors have a strong position in New Zealand’s high growth technology sector.  Berry says “Punakaiki Fund invests in exciting, often early stage, companies.  We look forward to giving more NZ investors the opportunity to take part in its growth.” 


About Punakaiki Fund
Punakaiki Fund invests in early stage and emerging New Zealand internet, technology and design-led growth businesses, generally well before they reach the public markets. 
Launched in April 2014, Punakaiki Fund currently has assets of over $12 million under management, including investments in Vend, Onceit, Vibe Communications, Raygun.io, Timely, RedSeed, Melon Health, EveredgeIP, ThisData, Influx, Boardingware and Weirdly.

 

Posted in NZ Business